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Exploring a Translanguaging Approach to Bilingual Education with Danling Fu - Shared screen with speaker view
Christina Graham
23:24
Hello from homestead high in Cupertino!
Virginia Crisco
23:51
Welcome!
Debra Robinson
23:51
Welcome to today’s webinar. Please tell us who you are and where you’re from.
Debra Robinson
24:08
Welcome to today’s webinar. Please tell us who you are and where you’re from.
Laura Plaisance
24:42
Laura Plaisance, Lancaster
Joann Lira
25:07
Hello, Joann Lira from Desert Sands, CA
Lynda Dubon-Chavez
25:16
Stay Connected with ERWC: https://linktr.ee/CSUERWC
Lynda Dubon-Chavez
26:10
The Rhetoric of Poetry with Daniel Summerhill: https://calstate.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_L2ynyFH4T3Syjk5JlhrbXw
Alejandra Pulido
36:24
This is very beautiful!
Shay Johnson
41:09
I like that idea of you having more channels to view the world, more ways to accurately express yourself
Jeremiah Henry
42:33
I figure that "third system" has so much potential power to critique the individual discourses of the systems that make up the "third system"
Shay Johnson
44:51
I would think so yes, because there is more perspective than one who has only one language system. especially considering that part of being fluent "native speaker" is about understanding the culture of that language and when it's appropriate to use what language and social idiosyncracies like commons jokes or stories and things
Lydia Zepeda
53:09
I have been told that its "rude" to speak my second language in front of those who don't speak/understand the language. Is it a "slippery slope"?
Shay Johnson
54:30
I think that depends. I'm sorry someone's told you it was rude. we have that issue at my job because people feel "left out" when they don't understand.
Shay Johnson
55:54
maybe depends on your audience. if you are having a private conversation, people around you don't need to know what you're saying. if you're presenting something though perhaps helpful to speak the L2 and then follow with an translation best you can?
Ginny Crisco
56:00
This approach is really challenging dominant ideas about language use and learning, so it’s too bad you were told that @Lydia. Now you have some theory to respond back.
Debra Robinson
58:45
I am not bilingual, but I enjoy traveling to other countries where I typically live as a language learner. People are always accepting of my language difference and it often becomes an exchange of knowledge thru language practice. I think the demand for English as a primary language to make monolingual speakers feel accepted is primarily an American concept that we need to adjust if we are to truly be the “melting pot” we claim to be.
Shay Johnson
59:35
what an amazing idea to connect to the community as a whole!
Roberta Ching
59:58
Just as we want students to develop rhetorical flexibility, we can encourage their linguistic flexibility—choosing the language resources that will best communicate to their audience.
Debra Robinson
01:02:04
Our school’s ELD teacher hosted a potluck were students brought food from their cultures to share with their classmates based on recipes from a class cookbook. It was fabulous!
Lydia Zepeda
01:08:56
@Ginny, thank you. I feel like it comes down to changing the mindsets and preconceived notions about multilingualism and embrace our "melting-pot"; thanks @Debra
Tracey Anderson
01:15:02
I am here as a speaker of Black English. Black English is often stigmatized and not accepted in academic or business spaces—written and spoken. People don’t understand it as a legitimate language which is very frustrating! I am working to incorporate code-meshing in my classroom.
Debra Robinson
01:17:46
Hi Tracey, students who speak Black English should be allowed to use their language also. The same theories applies. Translanguaging from the Black English perspective was stressed by April Baker-Bell in her webinar last year.
Debra Robinson
01:18:56
Dr. Fu will take questions. Please put them in the chat.
Tracey Anderson
01:19:46
@Debra. I love Baker-Bell’s work. I have an uphill battle ahead of me. But I’m ready.
Debra Robinson
01:20:08
Always here to help or act as a sound board.
lisa wong
01:20:25
There’s this school and district pressure to get students reclassified and fluent according to ELPAC scores and a designated percentile score on a standardized reading test, all within a certain time period. It's happening now while we are still emerging from the pandemic shutdown. It's painful pressure, especially when students are timed out of ELD programs into mainstream classrooms who don’t often get translanguage support. How will translanguage practice play into changing this practice.
Emily Devor
01:21:53
How would you recommend working with educators who are bound by tradition and struggle with allowing use of language other than English being used for student writing, reading, speaking, etc.?
Tracey Anderson
01:22:01
When will the academy accept Black English in written discourse? I am aware of the CCCC declaration fro 1974, but the academy seems slow to adjust. Do you see change on the horizon?
Tracey Anderson
01:22:18
from
Emely Campos
01:22:48
What would you suggest when the individual does not understand their native language and yet they need to know English.
Ginny Crisco
01:23:29
Yes! I am seeing some change but there is still some resistance at the publisher level. But I have been able to find scholarship in Black English as well as scholarship that uses translanguaging. There are definitely folks working on this in publications, but change is slow.
Shay Johnson
01:25:10
outside of the resources and research you shared, are there are books or videos you recommend for class projects or lesson plan ideas that incorporate translanguaging? I really like the class cookbook and also research project with bullying and want to find some that I could model for high school students
Christina Graham
01:27:28
thank you so much! lots of food for thought!
Grace Henson
01:27:41
Thank you so much!
Laura Plaisance
01:27:45
Thanks!
Grace Henson
01:27:50
Thank you!
Emily Devor
01:28:01
Thank you.
Jannelle Rattigan
01:28:15
Thank you.
Kimberly Hill
01:29:02
Thank You!
Anna Chee
01:29:03
Thank you for clear information on Translanguaging and its implications for pedagogy.
Shay Johnson
01:29:09
Wonderful! I will check them out, I'm excited to put this perspective into my lesson plans. you have been such a wealth of knowledge and thanks for putting all this together
lisa wong
01:29:42
Thank you
Debra Robinson
01:30:34
Thank you all for joining us. Happy Thanksgiving and enjoy your Winter Break/Happy Holidays!
Lydia Zepeda
01:31:36
I liked that you shared that teachers should allow students to write in their primary language. However, one critical issue we are facing in California, is the fact that many of the bilingual students (who speak Spanish), are not literate in their home language therefore, they cannot write in their primary language. Any suggestions?
Emely Campos
01:32:43
Thank you! Happy Holidays!!
Lydia Zepeda
01:33:17
Yes, she answered the question! Thank you!
Lydia Zepeda
01:36:01
Yes, our students speak and understand Spanish- they just don't read and write it. Understood
Anna Chee
01:36:43
Lydia, I think for ELs who cannot write in their L1, teach the English grammar or syntax, so that at least they have one language in which to write.
Anna Chee
01:37:19
And use multimedia, videos, pictures, photo, and drawings in addition to language
Lydia Zepeda
01:37:40
We are now promoting Dual Language School in our district. We have three Elementary school promoting this and its awesome!
Shay Johnson
01:37:52
thank you all, have a wonderful night!
Lydia Zepeda
01:38:36
Thank you! Come for a visit! You would be amazed!
Faye Melton
01:40:27
A pleasure to learn these ideas. Thank you Prof. Fu and facilitators! I had a couple students who had no literacy—in college and in high school. Adult Literacy tutors also can use some of the methods with individual and small group learners.
Daniel Martinez
01:42:23
Thank YOU! Have a great evening!